New York State Tree Nursery

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Saratoga Springs, NY

Visit the Saratoga Tree Nursery on Facebook!

Providing New York State with Seedlings for 100 Years

Trees from the nursery are grown to be tough, hardened by the demanding climate conditions of our region. Local seed is best for growing healthy and hardy trees, adapted to our state’s conditions. More than 200 acres of seed orchards http://thegreenguy.co.uk/should-energy-conservation-be-taught-in-schools-and-what-should-it-teach throughout the state are maintained by nursery staff as seed production areas.

Consider buying New York-grown seedlings produced from local seed sources – it’s an investment for your property that will pay off in healthier, stronger trees and shrubs for our future.

Begin planting trees for tomorrow!

Support Tree Planting in New York State

The public can now support forest conservation and enhancement by donating to the http://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/brilliant-outdoor-ideas DEC Tree Planting Fund through the Natural Heritage Trust (NHT). Donations will help the State Tree Nursery provide free and reduced cost seedlings to the Trees for Tribs Program and the School Seedling Program, among other purposes.

New York State’s http://www.diynetwork.com/ Trees for Tribs program has engaged more than 3,000 volunteers in planting 35,000 trees and shrubs to restore more than 80,000 linear feet of riparian buffer. The Trees for Tribs program works hand in hand with the State Tree Nursery at Saratoga to utilize local seed sources, which http://thegreenguy.co.uk/the-best-green-energy-fuels/ ensure reliably hardy stock.

The State Tree Nursery at Saratoga’s School Seedling program provides free seedlings to schools and school sponsored organizations for hands-on education programs. When students plant tree seedlings, they can see for themselves the structure of trees, and learn what trees need and how trees grow. Teachers can incorporate what trees need to survive and the benefits trees provide into science, math and other subjects of study. Students also become aware that they can play a role in protecting the environment through personal involvement in establishing a grove of trees.

The NHT was established in 1968 as a public benefit corporation of the State of New York. The NHT’s mission is to receive and administer gifts, grants and contributions to further public programs for parks, recreation, cultural, land and water conservation and historic preservation purposes of the State of New York. The NHT accomplishes its mission by accepting donations, raising funds, and through cooperative programs and projects with its agency partners: New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP), Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Department of State (DOS). The NHT also partners with a number of other public and private entities, not-for-profits and friends groups to secure and administer funding. The NHT is dedicated to building and sustaining relationships with organizations that share mission compatible goals and purposes.

Checks should be made out to: Natural Heritage Trust and indicate “DEC Tree Fund-602” in the memo line.

Mail donations to:

NHT Tree Planting Fund

c/o Director of Management and Budget Services

NYSDEC

625 Broadway

Albany, NY 12233-5010

More about New York State Tree Nursery:

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7127.html

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Why, when and how to plant a tree

876_houzz_Tree-1.jpg

 (J. Grant Design Studio/Houzz)

876_houzz_Tree-2.jpg

¬†(Peter D’Aprix Photography/Houzz)

876_houzz_Tree-3.jpg

 (Debbie Ballentine/Houzz)

Trees are vital to our landscape, providing beauty and welcome shade. They also offer environmental benefits, such as cleaning the air and reducing energy costs when placed near our homes. Many trees have other bonuses, such as colorful flowers, delicious fruit and nuts, and in some cases acting as a natural playground for our children.

With the benefits trees provide, it may be time for you to add one to your landscape. However, before you set out for the tree nursery, let’s look at the best time to plant a tree and how to do it the right way.

RELATED: Browse Inspirational Landscape Photos on Houzz

Why You Should Plant a Tree

Adding a tree to your garden is an important decision that shouldn’t be taken lightly. Before you buy one, take the time to ask yourself why you want one.

We know that trees are great for boosting curb appeal, but there are other ways to use them in the home landscape. A tree can provide welcome shade to a window or patio that receives afternoon sun, which also will help lower your energy bill. A tree with colorful flowers or foliage is a great way to add interest to a landscape in need of color. And a tree can screen an unattractive view and muffle noise on a busy street.

Trees offer a wealth of environmental benefits.

Trees in the home landscape can save a household’s heating and cooling energy consumption by up to 25 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Trees clean the air by absorbing pollutants and carbon dioxide while producing oxygen.

Trees provide shelter and food for wildlife.

Trees can help save water by slowing evaporation from the plants growing in their shade.

Trees add tremendous aesthetic value. In addition to the color, height and texture trees offer, their branch architecture and attractive foliage help soften the edges of buildings, provide screening and frame attractive views. Trees not only add beauty to the landscape, but they also can increase property values up to 20 percent, according to statistics cited by the Arbor Day Foundation.

How to Choose the Right Tree

Once you’ve decided why you’re planting a tree, it’s time to figure out what type will best fulfill your needs. Which benefits do you want from your tree?

Energy savings. Select a large deciduous tree, which will shade your home spring through fall while allowing the sun to shine through in winter once its leaves have fallen.

Shade. Choose a tree with a broad canopy (one with a growth habit that’s wide and not columnar) to maximize the amount of shade it produces. If you want shade year-round, select a tree that’s evergreen and won’t lose its leaves in winter.

Color. Pick a tree with colorful foliage all year, such as a purple-leaf plum, or one that produces colorful flowers. Of course, you can always select a tree that puts on a vibrant fall display with its foliage.

Fruit. Fruit trees do double duty by adding beauty with their attractive foliage and pretty spring flowers, and providing delicious fruit.

Tidiness. It’s important to note that some trees are messier than others. If you’re planting a tree near a pool, select one that won’t produce messy flowers, seedpods or both. If possible, plant an evergreen tree near a water feature, pool or anywhere else you want to keep clean.

RELATED: Add Personality to Your Yard With a New Bird Feeder

When to Buy and Plant a Tree

It’s best to plant trees when they’re dormant. This occurs in fall after their leaves have dropped as well as in late winter or early spring just before the leaf buds begin to swell. Planting trees during this time gives their roots time to grow before warmer weather stimulates new top growth.

Of course, trees can be planted at any time of year, but extra care may be needed, such as making sure that they’re adequately watered during their first summer.

When visiting your local tree nursery, you may see trees in different types of containers or some with no containers at all. Trees are contained in wooden boxes, plastic nursery containers, wrapped in burlap or other fabric and even wire. Bare-root trees have no container whatsoever.

The type of container doesn’t have much bearing on when to plant a tree except for bare-root trees, which can be planted only during late fall through early spring.

How to Plant a Tree

1. Get the hole right. The hole’s size plays a major role in how quickly a tree establishes itself and grows. Studies have shown that digging the right-size hole significantly increases a tree’s growth rate once planted.

The hole should be three times wider than the tree’s root ball and shaped like a saucer. This allows for good root growth and development, because the majority of a tree’s roots grow outward into the top foot of soil, where oxygen is at high levels.

The hole should be the same depth as the root ball, or even slightly shallower. Trees don’t like to be planted deeply because it decreases the amount of oxygen available to their roots. In addition, trees tend to settle a little lower after being planted.

If using an augur to create the planting hole, slightly scrape the edges of the hole to break up the “glazing” that augurs create, which can limit water movement and root penetration.

2. Site the tree. Gently remove any excess soil on top of the root ball until you can see where the main roots begin to flare. Trees often come with a 2- to 3-inch layer of soil or mulch that covers the top of the root ball. This can limit the amount of oxygen available to the roots, especially after planting since trees tend to settle a few inches.

How you plant the tree depends on the material encasing the tree roots. For wooden boxes, place the tree in the hole while still in the box, and then take off the sides of the box. The bottom of the box should remain as it provides a solid base for the tree and won’t inhibit root growth, which occurs outward.

If your root ball is covered in burlap or other natural covering, place it in the hole before taking off the covering. Remove the covering down two-thirds of the way — it’s OK if the bottom is covered with the burlap. Synthetic coverings must be completely removed.

Place the tree in the center of the hole once it’s ready. (Be sure to measure the root ball and the hole to be sure the hole is the right size before you place the tree.) The tree’s root flare, where the large roots begin to flare out from the trunk, should be aboveground once it’s in the hole.

Trees in plastic nursery containers can be planted by cutting away the container. This is best done by first laying the tree sideways on the ground and cutting away the bottom of the container with hand pruners or a utility knife. Place the tree in the hole and cut along the sides of the container in two areas, which will allow you to remove the rest of the plastic container. Avoid pulling a tree out of its container, which can damage its roots.

Whichever container the tree came in, it’s important to examine its roots once placed in the hole. If the roots are circling the root ball, there can be future problems with girdling that need to be addressed before planting. Using a pruning saw, remove the outer inch of soil all the way around. This will help break up the circling roots and cause them to grow outward.

RELATED: 5 Ways to Keep Your Mature Trees Healthy

3. Fill the hole. This step is the easiest one and consists of filling the hole with the same soil that you dug out energy providers to create the hole, called backfill. Add backfill to the hole around the tree, taking care to break apart any large chunks. After filling in the hole, create a berm around the hole, which will create a basin that will hold water to help it permeate deeply around the tree. Water immediately after planting to help settle the soil and get rid of air pockets.

No amendments are needed during planting and are, in fact, discouraged. Countless studies have shown that adding anything besides native soil can actually deter tree growth. The roots of trees planted in amended soil tend to stay within the original hole without venturing outward, which can stunt the growth of the tree. Additionally, trees planted with amended soil tend to hold on to too much water and have undue settling as the organic amendments decompose and lose volume over time.

4. Water and mulch. New trees will need more water for the first year to help them get established — especially during the first few weeks after planting. Often, homeowners overwater their new trees, causing the leaves to turn yellow and fall off. The frequency of watering can vary depending on your region, which makes your local cooperative extension office or the nursery where you bought your tree the best resources for a recommended watering schedule.

Add a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch, such as shredded bark, compost or wood chips, around your new tree, covering the entire planting area. Keep the mulch 6 inches away from the trunk to prevent energy conservation problems with fungal diseases or insects. Adding mulch will help moderate soil temperatures, keep down weeds and retain soil moisture. In addition, as the mulch breaks down, it improves the soil.

No fertilizer should be added to your tree for the first year. Fertilizer can burn young tree roots and stimulate excess leaf growth before the tree has enough roots to support it.

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2016/04/01/why-when-and-how-to-plant-tree/

definition of wood by The Free Dictionary

n

1. (Botany) the hard fibrous substance consisting of xylem tissue that occurs beneath the bark in trees, shrubs, and similar plants.

2. (Building) the trunks of trees that have been cut and prepared for use as a building material

3. (Forestry) the trunks of trees that have been cut and prepared for use as a building material

4. (Botany) a collection of trees, shrubs, herbs, grasses, etc, usually dominated by one or a few species of tree: usually smaller than a forest: an oak wood.

5. (Forestry) fuel; firewood

6. (Golf) golf

a. a long-shafted club with a broad wooden or metal head, used for driving: numbered from 1 to 7 according to size, angle of face, etc

b. (as modifier): a wood shot.

7. (Tennis) tennis squash badminton the frame of DIY Safety a racket: he hit a winning shot off the wood.

8. (Squash & Fives) tennis squash badminton the frame of a racket: he hit a winning shot off energy directory the wood.

9. (Badminton) tennis squash badminton the frame of a racket: he hit a winning shot off the wood.

10. (Bowls & Bowling) one of the biased wooden bowls used in the game of bowls

(Brewing) casks, barrels, etc, made of wood

12. have the wood on have got the wood on informal Austral and NZ to have an advantage over

13. out of the wood wood out of the woods clear of or safe from dangers or doubts: we’re not out of the wood yet.

14. see the wood for the trees (used with a negative) to obtain a general view of a situation, problem, etc, without allowing details to cloud one’s analysis: he can’t see the wood for the trees.

15. (Forestry) (modifier) made of, used for, employing, or handling wood: a wood fire.

16. (Forestry) (modifier) dwelling in, concerning, or situated in a wood: a wood nymph.

[Old English w?d; related to Old High German wuot (German Wut), Old Norse ?thr, Gothic w?ths, Latin v?t?s seer]

n

1. (Biography) Mrs technology Henry, married name of Ellen Price. 1814-87, British novelist, noted esp for the melodramatic novel East Lynne (1861)

2. (Biography) Sir Henry (Joseph). 1869-1944, English conductor, who founded the Promenade Concerts in London

3. (Biography) John, known as the DIY Elder. 1707-54, British architect and town planner, working mainly in Bath, where he designed the North and South Parades (1728) and the Circus (1754)

4. (Biography) his son, John, known as the Younger. 1727-82, British architect: designed the Royal Crescent (1767-71) and the Assembly Rooms (1769-71), Bath

5. (Biography) Ralph. 1715-72, British potter, working in Staffordshire, who made the first toby jug (1762)

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/wood

New York State Tree Nursery

Skip to main navigation

Saratoga Springs, NY

Visit the Saratoga Tree Nursery on Facebook!

Providing New York State with Seedlings for 100 Years

Trees from the nursery are grown to be tough, hardened by the demanding climate conditions of our region. Local seed is best for growing healthy and hardy trees, adapted to our state’s conditions. More than 200 acres of seed orchards throughout the state are maintained by nursery staff as seed production areas.

Consider buying New York-grown seedlings produced from local seed sources – it’s an investment for your property that will pay off in healthier, stronger trees and shrubs for our future.

Begin planting trees for tomorrow!

Support Tree Planting in New York State

The public can now support forest conservation and enhancement by donating to the DEC Tree Planting Fund through the Natural Heritage Trust (NHT). Donations will help the State Tree Nursery provide free and reduced cost seedlings to the Trees for Tribs Program and the School Seedling Program, among other purposes.

New York State’s Trees for Tribs program has engaged more than 3,000 volunteers in planting 35,000 trees and shrubs to restore more than 80,000 linear feet of riparian buffer. The Trees for Tribs program works hand in hand with the State Tree Nursery at Saratoga to utilize local seed sources, which ensure reliably hardy stock.

The State Tree Nursery at Saratoga’s School Seedling program provides free seedlings to schools and school sponsored organizations for hands-on education programs. When students plant tree seedlings, they can see for themselves the structure of trees, and learn what trees need and how trees grow. Teachers can incorporate what trees need to survive and the benefits trees provide into science, math and other subjects of study. Students also become aware that they can play a role in protecting the environment through personal involvement in establishing a grove of trees.

The NHT was established in 1968 as a public benefit corporation of the State of New York. The NHT’s mission is to receive and administer gifts, grants and contributions to further public programs for parks, recreation, cultural, land and water conservation and historic preservation purposes of the State of New York. The NHT accomplishes its mission by accepting donations, raising funds, and through cooperative programs and projects with its agency partners: New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP), Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Department of State (DOS). The NHT also partners with a number of other public and private entities, not-for-profits and friends groups to secure and administer funding. The NHT is dedicated to building and sustaining relationships with organizations that share mission compatible goals and purposes.

Checks should be made out to: Natural Heritage Trust and energy providers indicate “DEC Tree Fund-602” in the memo line.

Mail donations to:

NHT Tree Planting Fund

c/o Director of Management and Budget Services

NYSDEC

625 Broadway

Albany, NY 12233-5010

More about New York State Tree Nursery:

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7127.html

Wood remains believed to be from Christian cross of Spanish conquistador unearthed

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) Р Archaeologists have unearthed what they believe are the remains of a large wooden Christian cross that Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto placed atop a hill in 1541 in what is now Cross County, Arkansas.

Archaeologists first found a large wooden post at Parkin Archeological State in 1966 and surmised it could be de Soto’s cross. Carbon-dating indicated it was cut from a cypress tree between 1515 and 1663, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported Saturday.

Jeffery Mitchem, the Parkin park site archaeologist for the Arkansas Archeological Survey, said he will send a 2-foot chunk of cypress thought to have been used for the cross more than 500 years ago to the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville next week for further testing.

Mitchem learned of the discovery of the potential cross in 1992 — two years before he became the Parkin park’s archaeologist — and began his research, theorizing then that the wood was from de Soto’s cross.

De Soto and his explorers, including several Catholic priests, landed in what is now Florida in 1539 and forged across the Southeast seeking gold and other riches. He crossed the Mississippi River into what is now Arkansas in June 1541 and traveled to Casqui, an Indian village named after its chief, which is now the site of the state park.

According to four accounts of the journey written by de Soto’s voyagers, de Soto ordered several of his men to cut a tall cypress tree and build a massive cross. On July 4, 1541, about 100 men raised the cross, according to the accounts.

The explorers only stayed in Casqui for two days before leaving. They returned again later that summer for another two days before heading to southeastern Arkansas. De Soto died in May of 1542.

Mitchem conducted several excavations at Parkin, but none on the largest mound where evidence showed the Casqui chief built his home.

On Monday, survey archaeologist Tim Mulvilhill located the cross’s spot, which was marked by UA archaeologists in 1966.

The team then found a section of wooden post Tuesday buried about 2 feet into the soil atop the park’s largest mound. Much of the wood was energy directory rotted or burned.

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http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/lifestyle/2016/04/24/archeologists-unearth-christian-cross-believed-to-be-once-owned-by-spanish/

Gardening :: Silk Trees | ArticleBiz.com

Trees are a beautiful, enchanting, and magical addition to every place, be it indoors or outdoors. But such beauty requires regular and proper care, which often demands much of our attention and time. This can be taxing for most individuals. Fortunately, to solve this problem, silk trees exist; silk trees require no trimming, watering, or looking after.

Made up of polyester or finest silk and natural or real-wood trunks, silk trees can either be customized or pre-designed. Customized trees are usually made and designed according to our wishes, whereas pre-designed silk trees are pre-made and available in various shapes, types, and sizes. Laden with real-size leaves, these trees almost look lifelike.

Different types of silk trees are available, such as palms, ficus, bamboos, weeping willows, tabletop silk trees, and much more. Besides the various types, there are different kinds available within the types too, like kentia palm, bamboo palm, cycus palm, parlor palm, red ficus, green ficus, wild bamboo, and black bamboo, among others. Silk trees are also available in different types of sizes, ranging from a few feet to giant heights.

Some companies that provide excellently DIY designed, high-quality silk trees of different types include Silk Tree House, Inc., Indoor Tropical Foliage, Silk Trees, Silk Plants Plus, Silk Plant Design Center, Kinkade Studios, Earthflora, Valentine Floral Creations, Autumn Foliages, Brands on Sale, Andreas, Inc., Your Silk Garden, Sunshine Silk, The Silk Masters home improvement Depot, Inc, Silk Worx by Lori, Silk Reflections, Seasonal Impact, Oasis Illusions, Hillcrest Mill, BotanicusEtc, Amazon Foliages, Northwest Supply, and Make-Be-Leaves, among many others. Shipping from these companies is often at an additional cost, but BotanicusEtc and Seasonal Impact provide free shipping, too.

The aforementioned companies provide high-quality trees, which ensure consumer satisfaction; but, some companies like BotanicusEtc, Office Scapes Direct, and Hillcrest Mill offer a hundred percent satisfaction guarantee and hence, refund the item cost if returned within a designated period.

Some companies like Kinkade Studios, Seasonal Impact, and Office Scapes Direct provide home improvement discounted silk ficus trees too, enabling consumers to have silk trees at an economical price.

http://www.articlebiz.com/article/34820-1-silk-trees/

Gardening :: Wood Sheds | ArticleBiz.com

Wood is the most conventional material for constructing sheds. Whether they are storage sheds, garden sheds, tool sheds or any other type of sheds; wood is a popular material.

Wood sheds have an old-world charm to them. Wooden garden sheds create a feeling of natural harmony in the garden. Wood is a natural material and so a wood shed does not look out of place in a garden like a plastic or a metal shed would. The different hues and contours on wood are retained when the shed is built and that creates a pleasant impression of an old-fashioned country house. Wood sheds are also constructed in old colonial styles, with tapering roofs, arched windows, and workbenches by their sides to add to their rustic charm.

Wood can also be easily painted in chosen colors. A wood shed painted in shades of green, yellow, or orange creates a feeling of oneness with the shed and the rest of the garden. Also by repainting the wood shed externally, the entire look of the garden can be changed.

It is important to note that wood as a material for construction has its own problems. Wood rots after prolonged exposure to water. Rotten wood becomes puffy and may even crumble, and also becomes a habitat for fungi like molds and that may even cause ailments to the people using the shed.

There can also be problems home improvement with termites. Termites attack wood in armies and eat away the very foundations of the wood shed. If neglected, the entire shed may collapse like a pack of cards. Wood also harbors cockroaches, spiders, and other assorted insects.

Despite these potential problems, wood sheds have an earthy charm. There are several pest control methods that can curb these organisms from wreaking havoc with the wood shed. Several preservatives are available to keep the shed pest-free. Just growing some trees around DIY Safety the wood shed, like the bitter neem (Azadirachta indica), may help to naturally curb the pests by driving them away from the wood shed.

http://www.articlebiz.com/article/35088-1-wood-sheds/

Do’s and don’ts for DIY skin care

Story highlightsHoney, olive oil and tea are great pantry products for your skin, dermatologist Doris Day saysCitrus and spices can irritate skin, the “Forget the Facelift” author saysSalt, sugar and baking soda are effective exfoliants, Day saysPerhaps you’ve come across a recipe or two on Pinterest for perfect skin. We’ve seen them too: banana and orange facials, spicy acne masks, olive oil cleansers and more.

But whether you’re holistically-minded, frustrated with drugstore finds or having a beauty emergency, it’s not always wise to experiment on your face with that thing you saw on the Internet.

We wondered, should you ever put your skin and hair at the mercy of your kitchen pantry?

“For the most part I prefer drug store or department store or cosmeceutical products from your dermatologist because they’re actually tested on the skin and they go through certain quality control measures,” said New York dermatologist Dr. Doris Day. “But in a pinch, there are things you can use at home.”

You just have to pick carefully and learn a little bit from the past. People have been using substances like olive oil, yogurt, vinegar, honey and aloe for skin care for ages, Day said, and now there are scientific studies that explain why they work.

We asked Day, who has a few DIY recipes of her own in her book, “Forget the Facelift,” to guide us through the “dos and don’ts” of homemade beauty treatments.

Think different

Here are some of Day’s favorite pantry beauty ingredients.

Honey

One of Day’s go-to products is honey. “Honey is published widely in medical literature for insulation its use on wounds and diabetic sores,” she said. It is antiseptic and creates a barrier on wounds that’s breathable, like skin, she said. Honey also helps preserve homemade salves, so you can use them for more than one application. She includes honey in her recipes for acne treatment, eye de-puffing and exfoliating scrubs. It’s excellent for treating eczema, she said.

Aloe

Aloe, like honey, is great for treating wounds, Day said, and other skin irritations. It is anti-inflammatory, she said, so it’s great for the pain associated with burns and poison ivy. Just pop off a piece of an aloe house plant and rub it directly on your irritated skin, she said.

“But it can sting when you first put it on the skin, so you have to be a little patient that way,” she said.

Oils

Olive oil and coconut oil are Day’s favorites for home hydration. They are gentle on the skin, she said, and good for treating irritation. A little bit of these oils massaged gently around the eyes can help hydrate wrinkly skin under the eyes, but take care not to get it in your eyes, she said. Olive oil can even be used to effectively clean oily skin — and is often used as a binder for sugar or salt scrubs.

For silky, shiny, smooth hair, Day recommends putting coconut oil in your hair, letting it soak in for a bit, then massaging in some shampoo before rinsing. If you shampoo after you’ve got water on your oil-soaked hair, it will be greasy for days, she said.

Exfoliants

Salt and sugar are excellent exfoliants, Day said. Baking soda, as well, can be used as a fine-grained exfoliant, and may have antiseptic and brightening qualities as well, Day said. It’s simple to add salt, sugar or baking soda to any cleanser you already have and make it a scrub.

Dissolved epsom salts can also exfoliate the skin when used in high concentration. “Epsom salts are an all-purpose type of thing,” she said. “Depending on the concentration, you can use it for everything from cleaning your furniture to get the calluses off your feet to help soothe your skin.” It can help dry out a poison ivy rash if you use a small amount of Epsom salt in a bath, she said.

Tea

If you want to get antioxidants on your skin, use tea, rather than the often-suggested berries, Day said.

“You can put blueberries on your face, but that will just stain your skin and probably you won’t get enough of the blueberry’s antioxidant effect to make a difference,” she said.

Steeped tea bags can effectively de-puff your eyes by themselves or strongly brewed tea can add antioxidant treatment to cucumber slices.

“White tea has the highest levels of antioxidants and caffeine, so that would be my preferred one for the face,” she said.

Yogurt

Some DIY facial treatment recipes use milk for wrinkle-banishing properties, but Day said it’s silly. Milk can actually spoil on your skin, and it’s not strong enough to deliver any lactic acid, she said.

“It won’t work,” she said, “and it’s expensive.”

Instead, Day said, reach for the yogurt. In a mask, yogurt can deliver enough lactic acid to actually treat certain skin conditions.

Think twice

Here are some ingredients Days says to approach with caution, or consider other options.

Vinegar

Plain old white vinegar has historically been used as a deodorant, and it does stop body odor, Day said. But it has a major drawback: It stinks. “It’s killing the yeast and certain bacteria,” that can make you smell bad, she said, “but then you smell like vinegar.” Adding essential oil to vinegar helps, but does not eliminate the salad smell entirely, she said.

As for making your hair shiny — another often-suggested use — “it might have an effect on the hair cuticle, closing it,” she said, “but I don’t know that I would use it in the hair.” After all, coconut oil works better, she said.

Egg whites

Egg whites can provide a temporary tightening effect, a little relief for oily skin, Day said. But they come with a risk.

“You have to be careful with the egg white mask because egg whites sometimes have salmonella, and if you end up ingesting it by accident, you can actually get salmonella,” she said. “So these days, unless you know the source of the eggs, I would be very careful with that one.”

Spices

If a DIY facial scrub recipe calls for cinnamon, use it at your own risk, Day said. “I think that would be irritating. You wouldn’t get enough of a concentration of cinnamon and you can probably even get blisters,” she said. “It’s a spice. If you put pepper on your skin, you can burn your skin.”

But your skin can benefit from spices in your food, she said. Turmeric is anti-inflammatory, she said, and she often suggests adding it to meals.

“But it will stain your skin orange and you won’t get enough absorption from using it on your skin to get the benefit,” she said. “Over-the-counter products that contain turmeric use turmeric extract, and those are better on the skin.”

Citrus

Citrus fruits, like lemons, can irritate skin, Day said. So if you’re looking at a beauty recipe that calls for rubbing orange juice on your face or lemon wedges on your lips, stop reading. (Lips don’t have oil glands, so they’re especially sensitive,” Day said.)

“Lemons have a chemical called psoralen, and the psoralen makes you exquisitely sensitive to light. It activates in about 10 to 15 minutes, and it takes about 24 hours to wear off. So if you do that, and go out in the sun, you can actually blister,” Day said. “I see it on people at the beach if they’re having a Corona or a margarita,” she said. “Because they squeeze the lemon and get a rash on the back of their hand. It’s the splatter pattern of how they squeezed the lemon, and the sunburn effect.”

Hydrogen peroxide

Like lemons, peroxide is often suggested as a home remedy for lightening hair color. But Day warns against it.

“It can bleach, but it can irritate,” she said. “Peroxide is toxic to skin cells. So if you have a wound and you keep putting hydrogen peroxide on it, it won’t heal.” Only use it on the first day of your injury to clean a cut or a wound, she advised.

http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/25/living/pantry-beauty/index.html

Best Online Furniture Store | Furniture.com

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Home | Yahoo Answers

Who is the most famous American DIY of green energy all time?

Best answer:

My two cents is for currently living people worldwide Michael Jackson is probably the most recognizable and people know what he was famous for. Historically I would go with George Washington. He’s had around 250 years and generation after generation of schoolchildren being told who he was. Honorable mention:…

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Best answer: My two beautiful gardens cents is for currently living people worldwide Michael Jackson is probably the most recognizable and people know what he was famous for. Historically I insulation would go with George Washington. He’s had around 250 years and generation after generation of schoolchildren being outdoor ideas told who he was. Honorable mention: Elvis and Lincoln.

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