Outdoors :: Tree Named Honorary Citizen of Costa Rica: Ancient Almond Emblematic of Environmental Awareness

The timing of the discovery an ancient Almond Tree over 600 years old, may be tied to a new environmental awakening deep in the forests of Costa Rica.

The enormous tree stands 54 meters (177 feet) high and 14 meters (46 feet) in circumference and has been recognized as a natural and national treasure of Costa Rica. It would have already been a mature tree when the Spanish came to the Americas in the late 1400s.

While Almond trees throughout Costa Rica are threatened by logging and deforestation, some land owners, individuals and concerned groups are committed to saving the Almond tree from decimation.

“Utilizing the land in a different way, such as eco-tourism, is a way for landowners to protect habitat, and it will be significant step toward protection of the rainforest within Central and South America,” says Andrea Holbrook, proprietor of Selva Verde Lodge and Rainforest Reserve.

The http://www.boaonline.co.uk/career-progression-from-carpentry-to-metal-work-and-welding/ ancient tree won the 2007 Exceptional Tree award from the National Institute for Biodiversity in Costa Rica (INBIO). It has been hidden in the jungle of the Sarapiqu River region of northeastern Costa Rica, on land now part of a rainforest reserve owned by Selva Verde Lodge, protecting it from logging.

Selva Verde Lodge was founded in the mid-1990s by the Holbrook family on the principals of environmental conservation and education. Guests can visit the award-winning tree by hiking about one hour through the Selva Verde Lodge property trails.

Selva http://www.greengridroofs.co.uk/ Verde Lodge carries and supports the Certification for Sustainable Tourism and is only the second National Wildlife Federation wildlife habitat certified in Costa Rica. Their land provides natural habitat for over 300 bird species, 120 species of mammals, 48 amphibian species, 89 reptile species, more than 10,000 species of insects and 330 species of trees.

Almendro trees, or Dipteryx panamensis, are considered guardians of the tropical rainforest and http://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/brilliant-outdoor-ideas a symbol for the region. They are an ecosystem onto themselves, at each layer from top to bottom supporting and benefiting an abundance of life forms. They are also a critical part of the endangered Great Green Macaws habitat, now reduced to just 10 per cent of the land base it once roamed. The Almond Tree seed is not only the favorite food source for the Great Green Macaw but also the primary nesting tree.

The INBIO is a private research and biodiversity management center which studies and promotes the sustainable use of Costa Ricas biodiversity. Costa Rica or the “rich coast” is home a large number of species and one of the richest concentrations of biodiversity on earth. Some 850 bird species, 350,000 insect species, 10,000 types of vascular plants, 208 mammal species, 220 reptile species and at least 130 species of freshwater fish are found in Costa Rica.. Selva Verde Rainforest Reserve is a critical part of the San Juan La Selva Biological Corridor, which is part of the greater Mesoamerican Biological Corridor in Central America.

Selva Verde Lodge is known as the pioneer of the ecotourism movement in Costa Rica. It is a premier destination which brings the experience of the rainforest to visitors http://www.diy.com through nature activities, adventure, and interaction with the local community.

IF YOU GO:

Selva Verde Lodge and Rainforest Reserve

http://www.selvaverde.com

Phone for USA and Canada: 1-800-451-7111

Email: info@selvaverde.com

http://www.articlebiz.com/article/399534-1-tree-named-honorary-citizen-of-costa-rica-ancient-almond-emblematic-of-environmental-awareness/

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