Grow Your Own Indoor Garden

Have you thought about or even tried to start a garden without any luck? Organic Gardening magazine’s contributing editor Matthew Benson demystifies the gardening process and offers growing tips for 10 of the most popular herbs.

Before you get started, here are a couple things every amateur needs to know about the growing process.

Smart Techniques for Growing Herbs Indoors

Rooting a Cutting

Many herbs, including oregano, thyme, rosemary and sage, are best propagated for indoor growing by http://www.nigeldunnett.co.uk/ways-can-improve-home-gardening taking a cutting from an existing outdoor plant. To do it, snip off a 4-inch section, measured back from the tip. Strip off the lower leaves and stick the stem into moist, soil-less mix, such as perlite and-or vermiculite. To ensure good humidity, cover with glass or clear plastic, and keep the growing medium-moist.

The Olive Garden’s Secrets to SuccessTransition to Indoors

Before the first fall frost (while the weather is still on the mild side), start moving your potted herb plants toward their winter home. Instead of bringing them directly inside, put them in a bright, cool “transitional zone,” such as a garage, entryway or enclosed porch for a few weeks.

Once they’ve acclimated, move them to an area with lots of sun (south-facing windows are brightest, followed by east or west views). But protect them from heat and dryness. Most herbs prefer daytime temperatures of about 65 to 70 degrees, although they can withstand climbs into the 70s. It’s especially important that night temperatures drop at least 10 degrees — down into the 50s would be better — to simulate outdoor conditions.

Gardens and Science Help Prevent WarWith the exception of basil, they’ll even do well with occasional dips into the 40s. (So turn that thermostat down when you go to bed.) Place them outside on mild days, and give them regular baths to wash off dust.

Water, Light and Temperature

Most herbs like to be well watered but don’t like wet feet. That’s why good drainage is important. Water when the top of the container feels dry, or learn to judge the moisture in the soil by the weight of the pot. Add sand or vermiculite to the potting soil to ensure good drainage.

Urban Farming: Vertical Hydroponic Window FarmsLearn to juggle water, light and temperature. An herb in a clay pot in a south-facing window will need more water than one in a plastic pot in an east, or west, facing window. If the light is low, keep the temperature low.Indoor Gardening TipsPest Prevention

Choose the soil for your indoor herbs carefully. A good commercial potting soil is fine, or for a deluxe mix, blend one part potting soil with one part compost and one part vermiculite, perlite or sand (or a mixture of all three).

Resist the temptation to use disease- and pest-prone garden soil. And when you pot up garden-grown plants, remove as much of the garden soil as possible without damaging the roots.

Gloria Steinem on Birth Control and Climate

Keep such transplants separate from your other house plants while you’re gradually acclimating them to the indoors. If you see insects on a plant during this “quarantine,” leave it outside.

If, despite such defenses, your indoor plants do come under insect attack, help the herbs stay healthy by providing the correct mix of light and temperature, and give them regular baths. A plant weakened by hot, dry indoor conditions is even more susceptible to spider mite, whitefly or aphid damage than a healthy one.

If you choose to use soap sprays to control these pests, remember that the wet spray must come in contact with the insect to be effective. Spray in the evening (and never in bright sunlight) to prevent rapid drying, and wash off residues the next day (or before eating the leaves). Don’t spray very young seedlings with soap.

Why Are Some Flowers Red?

Hold back on the water and fertilizer through December, but when the days start getting longer in mid-January, feed them with liquid seaweed or compost. Even potted soil gets compacted as you water it, so cultivate it with a little fork, then top-dress it with compost.

February is usually a great month for indoor plants because of all the bright light. By March, they are starting to get buds, and in April, be sure to put them outside on a warm day. Then it won’t be long before the herbs — and you — are ready to move back to the garden.

Indoor Gardening TipsFour Types of Cabins for Great Escape10 Best Herbs for Indoor Growing

Basil

Start basil from seeds and place the pots in a south-facing window; it likes lots of sun and warmth.

Bay

A perennial that grows well in containers all year long.

Place the pot in an east, or west, facing window, but be sure it does not get crowded; bay needs air circulation to remain healthy.

Chervil

Start chervil seeds in late summer.

It grows well in low light but needs 65 to 70 F temperatures to thrive.

Chives

Dig up a clump from your garden at the end of the growing season and pot it up.

Leave the pot outside until the leaves die back.

In early winter, move the pot to your coolest indoor spot (such as a basement) for a few days, then finally to your brightest window.

Oregano

Your best bet is to start with a tip cutting from an outdoor plant.

Place the pot in a south-facing window.

Indoor Gardening Tips

Parsley

You can start this herb from seeds or dig up a clump from your garden at the end of the season.

Parsley likes full sun, but will grow slowly in an east, or west, facing window.

Rosemary

Start with a cutting of rosemary, and keep it in moist soilless mix until it roots.

It grows best in a south-facing window.

Sage

Take a tip cutting from an outdoor plant to start an indoor sage.

It tolerates dry, indoor air well, but it needs the strong sun it will get in a south-facing window.

Tarragon

A dormant period in late fall or early winter is essential for tarragon to grow indoors.

Pot up a mature plant from your outdoor garden and leave it outside until the leaves die back.

Bring it to your coolest indoor spot for a few days, then place it in a south-facing window for as much sun as possible.

Feed well with an organic liquid fertilizer.

Thyme

You can start thyme indoors either by rooting a soft tip cutting or by digging up and potting an outdoor plant.

Thyme likes full sun but will grow in an east, or west, facing window.

Place the pot in a south-facing window.

To learn more about indoor gardening, check out the latest issue of Organic Gardening magazine.

If you’re looking for seeds, herb disks, and equipment click here.

Click here to return to the “Good Morning America” website.

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/grow-indoor-garden/story?id=12545336

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